Review of Drama-Sutra by Nautanki Theatre: Indian and Chindian stories

When I arrived at Paramatta's Riverside Theatre for the reading of the three plays in development in the Drama-Sutra Playwriting Project a few weeks ago, the first thing I noticed was the poster on the wall promoting the 'Anh Do, The Happiest Refugee LIVE' show.  I'm sure you know the image - there's Anh Do's … Continue reading Review of Drama-Sutra by Nautanki Theatre: Indian and Chindian stories

Review of GLOW on Netflix: storytelling in the Trump era

Review of Glow Season 1 on Netflix

We all know that pro wrestling is not really sport, but an exercise in storytelling, right? The perilously tight spandex, the excessive ramming and slamming are just elements of the spectacle. And wrestling’s go-to plot is at the no frills end of narrative storytelling. It's the simple story of good vs evil, or in pro … Continue reading Review of GLOW on Netflix: storytelling in the Trump era

Netflixtherapy: or how the power of narrative saved me from depression

Netflixtherapy

  CONTENT WARNING: Please be aware that the following contains material about mental illness, which may be a trigger for some. For most of the past year, I was stuck in a depressive slump. An emotional ravine, a mood pothole. Luckily, it never reached bell jar severity requiring intervention (I've been hospitalised twice), but managed … Continue reading Netflixtherapy: or how the power of narrative saved me from depression

Review of Star Sand by Roger Pulvers: simple, short, sweet, a little too starry

Review of Star Sand by Roger Pulvers

Author Roger Pulvers is a polymath with a  formidable list of achievements that after perusing, usually require a lie down with a cold cloth on my forehead. He is the kind of person we might refer to as 'atama ga agaranai', a person whose achievements are so humbling that you are compelled to bow down … Continue reading Review of Star Sand by Roger Pulvers: simple, short, sweet, a little too starry

The end of PocketDocs: a loss to all humans who like audio stories

Natalie Kestecher, presenter of PocketDocs, ABC RN

The emotional love life of the majestic krill as presented by realer than real Attenborougheseque naturalist Wayne Funnell, the unsettling inbuilt pathos of Edgar Oliver's voice in Son of Rex, a boy's first bone cracking heartbreak written and narrated by Gary Bryson or the harrowingly tender redemptive letter Dear Antoinette are some of my favourites … Continue reading The end of PocketDocs: a loss to all humans who like audio stories

Review of Transparent Season 3: transcendent transgressions

Review of Transparent Season 3: transcendent transgressions

After  watching three seasons of Transparent, I find myself envying the Jews. The transgressions of the self absorbed, upper middle class Californian-Jewish Pfefferman clan makes my own dysfunctional family seem so excruciatingly banal that I'm wishing I could wallow in all that Jewish trauma. Which is perverse of course, and that to me is the … Continue reading Review of Transparent Season 3: transcendent transgressions