Review of Star Sand by Roger Pulvers: simple, short, sweet, a little too starry

Review of Star Sand by Roger Pulvers

Author Roger Pulvers is a polymath with a formidable list of achievements that after perusing, usually require a lie down with a cold cloth on my forehead. He is the kind of person we might refer to as ‘atama ga agaranai’, a person whose achievements are so humbling that you are compelled to bow down to them.

The end of PocketDocs: a loss to all ears

Natalie Kestecher, presenter of PocketDocs, ABC RN

Of the gazillion podcasts that now jostle for our audio attention, PocketDocs is one of the most professionally produced, always surprising, artistically sound shows in the English language. Given time, its back catalogue will become a listening room treasure trove, like a bottomless fridge of audio morsels.

Review of Transparent Season 3: transcendent transgressions

Review of Transparent Season 3: transcendent transgressions

After watching three seasons of Transparent, I find myself envying the Jews. The transgressions of the self absorbed, upper middle class Californian-Jewish Pfefferman clan makes my own dysfunctional family seem so excruciatingly banal that I'm wishing I could wallow in all that Jewish trauma. Which is perverse of course, and that to me is the attraction of Transparent.

Review of Nutshell by Ian McEwan: comico-erotic Hamlet

Review of Nutshell by Ian McEwan

This book is, in my view, a return to McEwan's former storytelling brilliance (after Solar and Sweet Tooth) because he does what he does best - explore the emotional crevices between love and devotion, love and hate, love and sex, love and morality, love and virtue.

Review of The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood: darkly inspiring

Review of The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

Written in a compelling dystopian tone, I appreciated the confidence author Charlotte Wood has in the reader to absorb her nuanced exploration of the complexities that make up the "female condition".

Carnival of the Bold: inspiring boldness

Carnival of the Bold 2016

A mish-mash of talents, from the awesomely indefatigable George Gittoes, the infectiously confident spoken word artist Sukhjit Kaur Khalsa, to the vibrantly charming Malaysian dissident cartoonist Zunar were some of this year’s line up of storytellers at the Carnival of the Bold 2016 (June 6, 2016).

Japanese Australian Identity in the Asian Australian Context: report on Mobilities, 5th Asian Australian Studies Research Network Conference, 2015 (Photo by Nikki Lam)

Photo by Nikki Lam

The most encouraging aspect of the conference was that diversity was a reality and a given, not an ideal or a promise. I was among Asian Australians of many colours and ages sharing ideas about the meaning of diaspora, hybridity, diversity and faith, transnationalism, mobilities, gender, art.